China slams surprise U.S. tariff threat, says it's ready to fight

China slams surprise U.S. tariff threat, says it's ready to fight

- in Business
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William Zarit, chairman of the American Chamber of Commerce in China, said Washington’s threat of tariffs appeared to have been “somewhat effective” thus far.

“I don’t think it is only a tactic, personally,” he told reporters on Wednesday, adding that the group does not view tariffs as the best way to address the trade frictions.

“The thinking became that if the U.S. doesn’t have any leverage and there is no pressure on our Chinese friends, then we will not have serious negotiations.”

China’s Commerce Ministry reacted swiftly overnight with a short statement, saying it was surprised and saw it as contrary to the consensus both sides had reached recently.

The Global Times said the United States was suffering from a “delusion” and warned that the “trade renege could leave Washington dancing with itself.”

The widely read tabloid is run by the Communist Party’s official People’s Daily, although its stance does not necessarily reflect Chinese government policy.

Image: Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross speaks to the Economic Club of New York in New York
Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross is scheduled to visit Beijing from June 2-4 to try and get China to agree to firm numbers for additional U.S. exports to the country.Brendan McDermid / Reuters file

“The Chinese government will have the necessary measures in place to deal with a U.S. withdrawal from any settled agreement. If the U.S. wants to play games, then China would be more than willing to play along and do so until the very end,” it said.

Commerce Secretary Ross is scheduled to visit Beijing from June 2 to June 4 to try and get China to agree to firm numbers for additional U.S. exports to the country.

The deal to reduce China’s trade surplus with the U.S. was separate from the U.S. probe into China’s alleged theft of intellectual property.

A White House official said on Tuesday that the U.S. government plans to shorten the length of visas issued to some Chinese citizens as part of a strategy to prevent intellectual property theft by U.S. rivals.

Citing a document issued by the Trump administration in December, the official said the U.S. government would consider restrictions on visas for science and technology students from some countries.

The China Daily newspaper said the repeated U.S. claim that Beijing had forced foreign firms to transfer their technologies to Chinese businesses was without evidence and was being used as an excuse to facilitate its trade protectionism.

It said technology transfers between U.S. companies and their Chinese partners were the result of normal business practices, not coercive policies.

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